Beginning of Pentecostalism

The Pentecost

Turning the other cheek, and with a new mission, Parham didn't fight the Holiness preachers who took Bethel Healing Home from him. Inspired by faith leaders such as Dowie and Stanford, Parham dreamed of a larger ministry that could not be contained within the building on Fourth and Jackson Street. He left his burdened ministry behind to start fresh. What would follow, in Parham's new healing home and Bible college, would be the beginning of Pentecostalism's doctrine. Parham directed his students in December of 1900 to search scripture for the definite sign of the baptism of the Holy Spirit. After coming to a unanimous conclusion that speaking in tongues was the initial evidence, Parham and his students began manifesting this gift.

Parham did not intend to create a denomination; however, his conviction that glossolalia was the initial evidence of baptism in the Holy Spirit separated his theology from the Holiness movement. Pentecostals see their movement as reflecting the same kind of spiritual gifts and teachings that were found in the Apostolic Age of the early church. Therefore, some Pentecostals use the term Apostolic or Full Gospel to describe their movement. This is the terminology favored by Parham. Other Pentecostals also used the name the Latter Rain Movement. These three names coalesce in the title given by Parham in his first report on this new phenomenon, "The Latter Rain: The Story of the Origin of the Original Apostolic or Pentecostal Movements".

Parham believed baptism in the Holy Spirit enabled Christians to live an empowered life and to help evangelize the world, thus ushering in the end times. This was accomplished through spiritual gifts such as speaking in tongues and divine healing. These beliefs would follow Parham around the country, spawning Pentecostal epicenters, leaders, and the largest Protestant denomination.

Beginning of Pentecostalism